Tag: Employees

Get that Dream Job with a Good Resume

Resume Writing Graphic

If you type “how to write a resume” into Google you are going to come up with thousands of results with varying and sometimes conflicting advice. That’s because there is no perfect way to write a resume. In fact, many experts recommend you steer clear from resume generating sites or cookie cutter formats all together. Resumes are unique and what you should and should not include varies based on several factors including industry, personal experience, profession and qualifications.

A good resume will get your foot in the door while a bad one may ruin your chances of landing the job from the start. There is no doubt that writing a resume can be a very daunting task and there really is no “right answer” in how you should do it. However, there are generally accepted guidelines that you can trust to help you along the way. We want you to be as successful as possible so before sitting down and updating your resume, take a minute to review these tips:

Spelling & Grammar: Missing typos or using bad grammar is the single easiest way to get your resume thrown out. Despite industry affiliation, most employers demand strong written communication skills in their new hires. To ensure your resume is free of any spelling and grammar mistakes, make sure you review it several times on several different occasions. Sometimes all you need is a pair of fresh eyes to catch a mistake you didn’t see before. In addition, have a friend or family member review it as well; the more people who review your resume, the less likely a simple error will go unnoticed and cost you your shot at landing an interview. For more advice, check out this list of top 5 grammar mistakes people tend to make on their resumes.

One size DOES NOT fit all: Sending out the same resume for every job that you apply for is not going to do you any favors and will most likely hurt your chances in the long run. Every job is different and every employer is looking for something different, so why would you give them all the same resume? You should customize your resume for each job you apply for. Although it may seem tedious and time consuming, you are increasing your chances of grabbing a hiring manager’s attention. If you’re not willing to tailor your resume to the job description, the employer has no reason to think that you are serious about the job opportunity and will not find it worth their while to call you in for an interview. Take your time to be thorough, research the company you are applying to work for, and tailor your resume to the job description. We promise the extra effort will pay off.

The key is in the keywords: With today’s advanced technology, most resumes are screened electronically before landing on an employer’s desk. Large companies in particular use computer technology that will search for keywords, keeping the resumes with them for review by a manager and discarding the rest. With that being said, you could have the best resume in the world but if it lacks the specific keywords the computer is looking for, your application won’t even make it into the hands of your potential employer. Although there is not a specific list of keywords to include on your resume, you can make a pretty good guess as to what they might be by carefully reading and analyzing the job description. For more information on how to identify and utilize key words on a resume click here.

Design for “Skimmability”: Most employers decide within a few seconds whether a resume is worth a full read or not, so you need to make sure yours is clean, consistent and easily readable. You do not want to distract the employer from reading what’s really important (your skills and experiences). Choose a modern classic font and stick with it. Make sure the margins are even and that the layout is navigable. You should avoid writing in paragraphs and instead present all of your information in clear and concise bullet points. A hiring manager is not going to work to find the information they need, so if it doesn’t stand out to them at the very beginning, the higher the chances are that your resume will end up in the reject pile. Sometimes people create flashy resumes that are designed to get the attention of an employer; this might be a good idea if you are pursuing a profession in a creative industry like design, but otherwise it is best to avoid using this tactic because it is risky and could be potentially distracting or unwanted to an employer.

Find a balance: A resume is about marketing yourself to an employer by telling a story about how and why your professional career up until this point has prepared you for the job. Often times people get caught up in trying to squeeze every experience right down to the first job they had in high school onto their resume. Although that job might be important to you, it may no longer be relevant. When it comes to writing a resume, it really is quality over quantity. Be specific and tell the employer your experiences that are both relevant and applicable to your ability to be successful in the position you are applying for. The standard rule of thumb is to keep your resume to a page in length. If you truly have enough relevant and important experience training and credentials, then it is okay to add a second page.

Accomplishments over responsibilities:
When listing your job experiences, it’s easy to get caught up in listing your job duties and responsibilities. An employer does not care so much about what you did while at your past job but instead is interested in what you accomplished. For example, did you drive sales up by 5%? Were you responsible for landing a new client? These are things you should take note of on your resume. A good way to do this is to include as many quantifiable facts and figures on your resume as possible, allowing potential employers to better visualize your capabilities and the positive contributions you’ve made working for past employers.

It’s easy to get caught up in the “do’s” and “don’ts” of resume writing. There is so much out there to consider that it’s easy to get lost in all of the technicalities. Before you go rewrite every line of your resume, we would like to remind you that it’s important you don’t edit your resume so much that it loses personality. At the end of the day, your resume is your introduction to your potential employer. Let them get to know you, but at the same time be honest, be concise and be relevant.

Written by Grace Mulleavey

45th Anniversary Announcement – A message from our President

Original Office in Terminal Building

Forty five years ago, Doug Hoyle and John Tanner opened the doors to Hoyle, Tanner & Associates, Inc. — an engineering firm, which at that time, specialized in aviation and wastewater services. Since then, we’ve experienced tremendous growth as a company, expanding our services across multiple engineering sectors, and opening branch offices throughout New England and Florida. Our success is attributed to our resilience in the face of challenges, our willingness to adapt in times of change, and our ability to be insightful in our decisions overtime.

Over the years, we have established a strong reputation as a firm that continuously provides innovative, high-quality and sustainable solutions to our clients. As president, it is a great honor to serve in a role that helps this company and the communities we serve to accomplish everything we have set out to achieve. Our employees are not just a means to production, but part of a unique family, united under a culture of respect, social responsibility and collaboration. It is truly a joy to come to work every day and both mentor and learn from some of the best professionals in the industry.

Looking ahead, our future as a company is promising. We have been and will continue to be a small firm with large firm capabilities. We will grow not for the sake of growing, but to provide extended opportunities to both our clients and our employees. We will do so organically by promoting from within and forming strategic mergers and acquisitions. I am confident in the capabilities of our team and am enthusiastic about our future, which shines bright with the promise of continued innovation, creativity and insight. This year, on our anniversary, Hoyle, Tanner proudly acknowledges the past 45 years, but more importantly celebrates the outstanding, innovative and quality engineering that will see our company through the next 45 years and beyond.

Employee Spotlight: Fran Weaver

Fran
Fran Weaver, Grant Administrator at work & Avid Recycler/Earth Enthusiast in free time
  1. What has drawn you to and kept you at Hoyle, Tanner?
    • Well the real reason I came here is because someone I used to work for, Bill E., called me and said, “Are you looking for a job?” So I came into the interview and it was odd. It was December 1997, and the company was just moving into this space [the mill building]. There were moving boxes everywhere. It was strange. The other interesting thing that happened is that Bill worked in this building for a place called Pandora. I’d worked for Bill in this same building! It was like coming home [laughs]. The people have obviously kept me here. They’re wonderful. [Chuckles] It’s been a thrilling ride!
  2. What’s your favorite thing to see in the office?
    • My favorite thing to see is… happy people. Happy people coming into the office, getting their coffee, settling in for the day. Yeah, happy people.
  3. My favorite time of year to work at Hoyle, Tanner is _____ because…
    • Is there a least favorite? [Laughs] No, I won’t say least favorite. I guess my busiest time and hardest time, and therefore least favorite is April. Because that’s when we’re pushing to get all our grants done for our clients. And then May 1 is when all the grants are due and it’s a collective sigh of relief. I usually take a couple of days off after to recuperate.
  4. What is one thing you feel you have to do before the end of your life? Bucket list item?
    • I’m getting awfully close to that you know! [Laughs] Move to Maine. It’s where most of our clients live, though that’s not the reason I’d move there. I’ve always been drawn to it. The seacoast.
  5. Do you have a favorite quote? Something you live by?
    • “Do unto others.” That’s it.
  6. If you were to skydive, what would you think about most on your way down?
    • “How long is it till I crash?” [Laughs] I’m not a roller coaster person. I know I’d be closing my eyes, saying “Is it over yet? Is it over yet?” A plane is a different story. [We] flew to Augusta, Maine and that was awesome.
  7. If you were to enter a talent contest and you could do anything, what would be your talent?
    • Can I cook? I would cook. I’d make a special meal for the judges.
  8. Favorite food?
    • Seafood—lobster specifically.
  9. My heart melts at the sight of______:
    • [Without hesitation] Puppies.
  10. When you’re not working, what could people most likely find you doing?
    • Volunteering. I volunteer for different organizations. I do walkathons for the animal shelter, and I volunteer for New Horizons Soup Kitchen and Shelter. Through New Horizons I do 5k races. If you volunteer to help at the races, donations go to New Horizons and other organizations. My two favorites are the Friends of Manchester Animal Shelter and New Horizons.

Unifying Beautification Efforts in the Millyard

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In honor of Earth Day 2016, members of our team are hitting the streets and giving back to the Manchester community by participating in Intown Manchester’s #AdoptABlock neighborhood clean-up effort. Intown Manchester is the only Business Improvement District in the State of New Hampshire and is “working in cooperation with the City of Manchester to increase downtown’s competitiveness and to affirm Manchester’s position as an economic leader of the New England region.”

In addition to working in our corporate headquarters in the Millyard, many of our employees call the Queen City home and, therefore, the clean-up effort provides an opportunity for us to give back to them and the public. The Adopt-a-Block program is bringing together local business men and women to unify the beautification efforts and improve Manchester’s livability.

“We’re excited to participate in our first “Adopt-A-Block” and look forward to spending time with many of our Millyard neighbors making a positive impact to the community we work and live in,” states Jen Pelletier, Marketing Manager. “The fact that the event falls on Earth Day is extra special, we have the opportunity to take part in the largest secular civic event in the world.”

In New Hampshire, numerous Earth Day celebrations and volunteer activities are planned to inspire residents to get involved in conserving our planet for years to come. To find out more about Earth Day and to get involved… Take Action!

The Value of an Internship

sticky-notes-to-do-list-Edited

Navigating through college can be a tough endeavor for a lot of people. There is only so much that high school can do to prepare a student for what they can expect from college life and even less where career preparation is concerned. Luckily, in every college, exists the opportunity to gain real world experience and knowledge in whatever academic field a student chooses and often these opportunities can, when approached with the right attitude and with the right timing, lead to a potential career after college. I am talking of course about internships; often stereotyped as a position involving coffee runs, slave labor, underappreciated efforts and a general sense of hopelessness that the experience will lead to nothing but a few credits and a lot of wasted time. Fortunately for the most part, these stereotypes are nothing more than exaggerated tales from a few bad experiences and these days more and more students are realizing the importance of an internship, paid or unpaid in their respective field.

The benefit of an internship in the field of engineering is exceptional in what can be gained from it for the both the intern and the firm alike. Participating in an engineering internship allows the student to fully immerse themselves into their chosen career with real world applications through hands on projects that they may or may not be exposed to in their classes, as well as allowing them to explore other disciplines they may have never knew they were interested in. The firm on the other hand can not only gain additional manpower for arduous projects, but can benefit from a fresh mind with new ideas that is likely eager to learn and put classroom theories into practice.

We at Hoyle, Tanner believe in the value of an internship and what the experience can provide young and aspiring engineers. We regularly take on interns for summer positions as they near the end of their college career in an effort to prepare them for a long and successful career in civil engineering.

Hoyle, Tanner currently has two interns working in our Manchester headquarters this summer. Katelyn Welch, who is working with our bridge group and Amy Johnson, who is working with our environmental group. I recently talked with both of them to get a better understanding of what they feel are the benefits of an internship in the engineering field, and what I found out was that engineering students who seek out an internship have more than a few things in common; the main aspect being that they want to be challenged. The challenge seems to be the driving force behind the decision to pursue major in engineering in the first place as those in the field tend to have a curiosity in new ways to approach a problem as well as a desire for growth and continual education.

The value of the internship really shines through when they are given the opportunity to work in the field and experience what the job is really like. Both Katelyn and Amy noted that the work they have done so far has exceeded their expectations. Since engineering is very much a team effort, they have both been given the opportunity to collaborate with our full time staff on a wide variety of projects and have been fully involved throughout the process. Aside from their direct involvement with Hoyle, Tanner projects, both Katelyn and Amy are gaining insight into a lot of aspects of engineering in the real world that will surely give them a leg up in the future, such as countless terms, procedures, tasks and calculations that they feel they wouldn’t learn otherwise as well as gaining a better understanding of their chosen major/field is the right fit for them.

The other value they feel an internship provides is the anticipated ease of transition that comes when they enter the workforce after college. This much should be obviously evident, however, so many college graduates find out that they are either underqualified and need to take an entry level position at low pay when they need to actually make a paycheck, or that they are severely underprepared for what lies ahead of them. While many colleges have opted to make an internship mandatory to graduate, this is not always the case. With internships typically paying little to no money, many of them forego the opportunity to take on a low paying internship that would provide real world experience for a full time job on top of being a full time student. What we find with this recurring trend is a growing number of students who are graduating with little to no experience in their chosen field and without the connections that an internship provides, they are often left to fend for themselves in a sea of jobs with increasing standards and expectations for incoming applicants for entry level positions.

Fortunately, with this realization, many internships are either offering some form of pay or those who can’t afford to pay are working with local colleges to offer substantial credits towards the degree and in turn, more and more students are willing to take on an internship and more of these opportunities are leading to full time careers for the student at that company after graduation or it could lead to networking opportunities for those students that they may have not had before.

It is clear that the field of engineering is one that requires real immersion and involvement to really understand what to expect and can’t be mastered through books and classes alone. Internships like the ones we offer here at Hoyle, Tanner provide students with the real world knowledge and experience that is necessary to a successful career in the civil engineering world. If you are interested in an internship with Hoyle, Tanner visit our careers page or contact our Human Resources Department.

To Blog or Not to Blog… This is Your Answer

Marisa-blog

Recently, we have found ourselves asking the questions of whether or not to blog; who would be interested in what we have to say; and would we have “followers”? An idea was posed to incorporate a more personal touch to our social media stream on Facebook allowing our fans to see the more compassionate, community-engaged side of our company. The first step in this process has been to incorporate an employee spotlight that has little to do with what the employee actually works on and more about WHO they are.

Well the response we got on our first post about Jeff Collins spoke volumes to us, showing us that our clients/contacts/fans/followers (whatever you want to label them as) wants to get to know the more personal side. Reaching more than 651 people (and counting) with that post made us realize that there is more to each and every one of our employees, more than just bridges or treatment facilities, etc. and that all of you want to really know us, which is what makes us different. Hoyle, Tanner is the company it is because of our clients, employees, and communities! Welcome to our blog, we can’t wait for you to get to know us better and for us to get to know you all.