Month: August 2019

Employee Spotlight: Patrick Sharrow

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Patrick Sharrow, Airport Planner and Outdoor Enthusiast
 
1. What drew you to Hoyle, Tanner?
I enjoy working in all aspects of aviation. Planning gives me a chance to work directly with airport managers on a variety of issues at a wide variety of airports. As a former Airport Manager, I can appreciate the issues that surface on a daily basis. I really enjoy working through these unique challenges and believe providing an outside point-of-view is valuable. Working for Hoyle, Tanner also gives me the ability to think outside the box and really get into the weeds utilizing new thoughts, methods, and technology to solve problems. I’ve always wanted to be part of a company that made me feel like a family member. Company that has large goals with a work life balance.
 
2. What’s something invaluable you’ve learned here?
The culture of continuous learning. There is so much to learn! I have gained a new perspective. I relate airport consulting to fly fishing. You can fly fish your entire life and never truly master the art. As is with airport planning and consulting, and this is what makes it so intriguing and addicting! The continuous challenge and sense of accomplishment when it all comes together.
 
3. What’s your favorite time of year to work at Hoyle, Tanner?
I like the summertime. I travel a lot to visit clients and airports in general. I enjoy the views along the drive and enjoy seeing new places. Occasionally when I am off the clock and come across a nice river I’ll take a pit stop and toss the line.
 
4. What’s the coolest thing you are working on?
I enjoy working with airport managers at a variety of airports in a wide variety of locations.
Advances in UAS technology and finding new ways to utilize UAS technology to increase safety and efficiency in the aviation industry.
 
5. What’s the best thing that’s happened to you so far this week?
I got to fly a seaplane into my camp on Lake Champlain! I have always wanted to fly a seaplane!
 
6. What kind of pet do you have and how did you choose to name it?
Lab Whippet mix named Piper after a Piper Cherokee that I fly. She has been raised on airports. From working on the airfield during wildlife management to walking the terminal with TSA and Police K9s, and of course hours of hangar lounging.
 
7. What is a fun or interesting fact about your hometown?
I grew up in Charlotte Vermont which is about a half-hour south of Burlington. When I was in 8th grade some people found a whale skeleton by the railroad tracks. It was a really cool reminder that this land was once covered in ocean.
 
8. What are three things still left on your bucket list
• Spend some time exploring Alaska
• Climb Mt. Rainier in Washington
• Visit all the national park
 
9. Name three items you’d take with you to a desert island
My Boat, Fishing rod and my Mandolin. I figure the boat may come in handy if I would like to get off the island.
 

10. How old is the oldest item in your closet?
I have a box of old aircraft parts. Literally nuts and bolts and pieces of metal that were from a B-24 Liberator that crashed into Camels Hump on Oct. 16, 1944. My uncle gave them to me years ago, and I was always going to make a shadow box or something with them.

11. Words to live by? Favorite quote
“It is never too late to be what you might have been.” (Quote sometimes attributed to George Eliot)

12. What did you want to be when you were growing up?
An aerospace engineer. Then I started working on plans at the local airstrip and soon after started flying. That sold me on aviation, and I never looked back.

13. If you were to skydive from an airplane what would you think about on the way down?
I have been skydiving multiple times! Honestly, it’s such a rush I can’t get over the beauty of being so high with nothing around you and the sensation of free-falling through the air followed by flying under the canopy. There’s not much that can beat that feeling.

Volunteers: Making a Difference for our Children

Manchester Police ACERT Teddy Bear drive

Here at Hoyle, Tanner, we are continually impressed by the dedication and hard work of our employees – not just in the office, but in the community.

One of the benefits of working at Hoyle, Tanner is the volunteer program: Employees can spend 8 paid hours at a charity or cause they care about. Since the beginning of 2019, we have had 11 employees volunteer time at many different organizations; total volunteered hours are up to 50 that are documented.

But it’s not just this year that our employees have been exemplary citizens in their communities. In 2017, we had 22 employees volunteer or donate to more than 15 causes. In 2018, we documented 148.5 hours that people spent volunteering at organizations outside of the office per the volunteer time benefit.

Over the past months, a great concentration of our volunteering efforts has gone towards helping children. From kindergarten to college, our employees have worked with children and students on varying levels. Below is a snapshot of all the ways Hoyle, Tanner employees have helped our youth this year:
Hoyle, Tanner employees pictured with students in various volunteer efforts

  • Nicole Crawford worked with a group of UNH students to expose them to engineering on an airport project. Aside from providing students with hands-on experience before they graduate, this project highlighted one of New Hampshire’s largest recent aviation infrastructure projects and gave them some insight into working on complicated, multi-disciplined, and customer-focused airfield projects.
  • Audrey Beaulac, PE, CPSWQ and Matthew Low, PE went to Middle School at Parkside in Manchester to listen to an inspired group of 7th graders present their projects on stormwater treatment. The projects were focused on improving water quality around their school knowing that the school’s parking and recreational areas will be upgraded this summer based upon Hoyle, Tanner’s recent design.
  • Bow High School has a program that allows students a day out of the classroom to job shadow. Kyle visited our headquarters on May 23 to job shadow each of our technical disciplines in the engineering industry. He had the opportunity to meet with eight different engineers to learn about their day-to-day work.
  • After a public plea by the local police department, Hoyle, Tanner employees donated teddy bears to the Manchester NH Police Department. Officers keep the stuffed animals in their cars so that when the Adverse Childhood Experiences Response Team (ACERT) respond to difficult situations, they can give children something to comfort them.
  • On April 24, Dave Langlais, PE, volunteered at the Sophomore Career Expo at Tyngsboro High School. He spoke to students about the different types of jobs that are available in the engineering industry. Dave then illustrated his own personal career path, training programs, and education as well as how he has become a respected, well-liked leader of our Massachusetts office.
    • On March 14, Dave Langlais served as the 5th grade judge for the school-wide science fair where the students present projects that they have worked on over the past couple of months. They are judged on use of the scientific method, presentation, originality, and knowledge and understanding of the research they did to support their project. Projects covered a wide variety of topics including corrosion, teeth, kinetic energy, evaporation, Vitamin C, and fertilizer to name just a few.
  • On March 22, one of our junior aviation engineers, Taylor Kirk, visited his former high school. Biddeford Regional Center of Technology -Engineering & Architectural Design welcomed him back as he spoke with engineering and architectural design students. Taylor presented exciting aviation projects he has worked on over the past year to inspire students to take an interest in aviation engineering.

We are committed to bettering our communities through volunteering. We are proud of our employees for their interest and guidance as we secure a brighter future for younger generations.

The New Hampshire MS4 Stormwater Permit: What’s Next?

Image of a stormwater outfall area as body of water

For our friends in the MS4 communities, hopefully, you completed the Year 1 requirements to meet the June 30, 2019 deadline. This included, among other things, completion of a Stormwater Management Plan (SWMP), Illicit Discharge and Detection Elimination (IDDE) Plan, outfall ranking and prioritization for subsequent outfall investigations, construction site runoff control procedures, a schedule for catch basin cleaning, a schedule for street sweeping, written winter road maintenance procedures, distribute two targeted messages (depending on the community), and develop a Chloride Reduction Plan. So, what’s next?

MS4 communities must continue to work on/update the stormwater system mapping. This includes key elements and features of the stormwater conveyance system, structural Best Management Practices (BMPs), open channels, etc. 2003 MS4 communities have two years (until June 30, 2020) to complete the update of the stormwater system mapping. New MS4 communities as of the 2017 MS4 have 3 years (until June 30, 2021) in which to complete the mapping of their stormwater system. As part of this effort, the initial catchment delineations should be refined as well. Systematic investigation of problem catchments, or high-priority catchments if there are no problem catchments, is to be started. A written catchment investigation procedure must be developed by December 31, 2019.

The investigation of problem and high-priority outfalls starts with a field inspection during dry weather. If dry-weather flow is observed, then further screening is required to determine if there may potentially be illicit discharges present. This can be done using field test kits; however, screening for bacteria requires laboratory testing. The results of the screening will determine whether additional investigation is required to determine sources of illicit discharges. The outfall ranking and prioritization will also be updated accordingly.

Stormwater outfall concrete pipe with water draining out of itGood housekeeping procedures must be developed for permittee-owned facilities, including: develop inventory of all permittee-owned facilities; develop O&M procedures for municipal activities; develop O&M procedures to reduce/minimize/eliminate discharge of pollutants; develop and implement Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) for municipally-owned facilities such as maintenance garages, public works yards, salt sheds, transfer stations and other areas where pollutants are exposed to stormwater; and cover salt storage areas. Are you having fun yet?

Public Education and Outreach activities must be continued during Year 2. This involves distributing two targeted messages.

Permittees lucky enough to have discharges to waters with an approved Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) have additional activities to complete during Year 2 as well. Permittees subject to an approved TMDL for chlorides must begin implementation of their Chloride Reduction Plan. Permittees subject to an approved bacteria and pathogen TMDL must disseminate public education materials and work on implementation of their IDDE plan. Permittees subject to a phosphorus TMDL must have a legal analysis of their Lake Phosphorus Control Plan (LPCP) completed.

Permittees with discharges to impaired waters without an approved TMDL would be well advised to begin planning for future MS4 permit obligations as well. Impairments to waters without an approved TMDL include: nitrogen, phosphorus, bacteria or pathogens, chloride, total suspended solids, metals, and oil and grease. Did you know that leaf litter contributes phosphorus and nitrogen to stormwater runoff?

Did I mention that the Year 1 annual report must be completed and submitted by the EPA-extended date of September 30, 2019? The reporting period for Year 1 is from May 1, 2018 to June 30, 2019. The reporting period is from July 1 to June 30 for all subsequent years. The EPA has developed a template based on the 2017 MS4 permit that can be used for the annual report. The template can be found here.

The Hoyle, Tanner team of experts is available to assist you as needed with MS4 permit compliance. If you have questions, please contact Michael Trainque (mtrainque@hoyletanner.com) or Heidi Marshall (hmarshall@hoyletanner.com) at Hoyle, Tanner & Associates, Inc.

 

Additional information:

https://www.epa.gov/npdes-permits/new-hampshire-small-ms4-general-permit

https://www.epa.gov/npdes-permits/stormwater-tools-new-england#arr

How Hoyle, Tanner is Saving Time and Money with Drone Flights

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Clearing the air! This is what our small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (sUAS – commonly referred to as drones), operators Evan McDougal, CM and Patrick Sharrow, AAE are incorporating into airspace analysis. Evan and Patrick are just two of Hoyle, Tanner’s professional Part 107 remote pilots who are utilizing photogrammetry and advanced autonomous sUAS technology to analyze and access airspace obstructions. With recent media highlighting the challenges of integrating sUAS operations into the National Airspace System, it is an exciting time to focus on the safer, less expensive, and expedient capabilities that these vehicles make possible.

Many organizations, both private and government, are interested in what these small flying sensor system platforms can do. For instance, many state aeronautics agencies that oversee the safety and operation of multiple airports can spend weeks with multiple survey teams and inspectors traveling from airport to airport assessing tree canopy and surrounding buildings – all in an effort to determine if there are obstructions to FAA approach and departure surfaces and pilots utilizing the runway.

In contrast, a drone can be flown by a trained and qualified pilot to collect accurate obstruction data. The three-dimensional results can show the entire area in many formats in a fraction of the time and cost it would take a ground survey crew or aerial survey.

Hoyle, Tanner is passionate about increasing safety and efficiency in aviation. During the September 2018 National Association of State Aviation Officials (NASAO) Annual conference in Oklahoma, Evan McDougal demonstrated his enthusiasm for the emerging technology and the airspace analysis applications we have developed.

Evan showed interested State Aeronautics Department Representatives how they could benefit using sUAS systems for obstruction analysis. Bryan Budds, Transport and Safety Section Manager at the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT), was quick to recognize the benefits of this capability and the opportunity to advance the MDOT existing drone program. He arranged for Hoyle, Tanner to spend three days training DOT employees on how to collect accurate obstruction data using drones as well as process it into meaningful deliverables.

The information gathered in the sUAS flights is used to create detailed 3D models of the airport including trees, pavement condition, ground contour elevations, and surrounding land development. Once collected, the data can be used to graphically depict airspace approach corridors that are not able to be seen with the naked eye. Obstructions are clearly shown protruding into protected airspace making it much easier for the airport and responsible landowners to agree on obstruction removal alternatives.

With the proper coordination of sUAS data collection and software processing systems, “clearing the air” can be done economically, accurately, and efficiently. The exciting reality of the sUAS market is that the sky is the limit! Hoyle, Tanner is committed to continually evolving and developing new opportunities to increase safety and efficiency in aviation moving into the future.

Curious about how you could use drones on your next project? Contact our experts Patrick Sharrow, AAE, psharrow@hoyletanner.com or Evan McDougal, CM emcdougal@hoyletanner.com