Month: April 2016

Unifying Beautification Efforts in the Millyard

DSC-0091-Resized

In honor of Earth Day 2016, members of our team are hitting the streets and giving back to the Manchester community by participating in Intown Manchester’s #AdoptABlock neighborhood clean-up effort. Intown Manchester is the only Business Improvement District in the State of New Hampshire and is “working in cooperation with the City of Manchester to increase downtown’s competitiveness and to affirm Manchester’s position as an economic leader of the New England region.”

In addition to working in our corporate headquarters in the Millyard, many of our employees call the Queen City home and, therefore, the clean-up effort provides an opportunity for us to give back to them and the public. The Adopt-a-Block program is bringing together local business men and women to unify the beautification efforts and improve Manchester’s livability.

“We’re excited to participate in our first “Adopt-A-Block” and look forward to spending time with many of our Millyard neighbors making a positive impact to the community we work and live in,” states Jen Pelletier, Marketing Manager. “The fact that the event falls on Earth Day is extra special, we have the opportunity to take part in the largest secular civic event in the world.”

In New Hampshire, numerous Earth Day celebrations and volunteer activities are planned to inspire residents to get involved in conserving our planet for years to come. To find out more about Earth Day and to get involved… Take Action!

How Your Community Plays a Part in National Walk to Work Day

IMG_1665-Web

Spring has arrived just in time for National Walk to Work Day! Individuals across the country are lacing up their sneakers and hitting the pavement, while communities are taking a more holistic approach to ensuring safe pedestrian and bicycle travel. Many municipalities are introducing the concept of “complete streets”, introduced by the National Complete Streets Coalition, to their design efforts to balance safety and convenience for motorists, transit users, pedestrians and cyclists alike. Currently, there isn’t a single design for a complete street; it represents creating roads that are safe for all users, regardless of age, ability, or transportation method. Growing in popularity, some of the complete streets features are being implemented throughout the state, including:

Traffic Calming
With the growing demand for alternative modes of transportation, traffic calming measures are being introduced on various roadways to ensure safe travel for all users. The use of narrowed throughways, speed bumps/humps/tables,chicanes, and curb extensions (bulbouts) are some of the many features being used in the efforts to slow automobile travel, including the Union Street Reconstruction in Peterborough, New Hampshire. This project also incorporated tree plantings along the medians to beautify the area.

High Visibility Crosswalks
History shows pedestrian crossings existing more than 2000 years ago, where raised blocks on roadways provided a means for pedestrians to cross without having to step on the street itself. In current designs, high visibility crosswalks are incorporated to guide pedestrians and alert motorists to the crossing locations. Six foot wide crosswalks are installed using long lasting plastic/epoxy or paint embedded with reflective glass beads to assist in the crossing markings. In addition to local governments, universities, like the University of New Hampshire, are incorporating these crosswalks on their campuses.

Shared Use Paths
A multi-use path or trail that has been separated from motor vehicle travel and has been established for alternative transportation purposes is another option that is growing in popularity. Utilizing existing right-of-ways to create these travel corridors for pedestrians, cyclists, skaters, equestrians, and other non-motorized users in some instances are also used to observe the natural environment in various communities. Recently, a shared use path was completed connecting Manchester’s and Goffstown’s trail system.

Multi-Modal Intersection
Intersections have the unique responsibility of accommodating and coordinating the nearly-constant occurrence of conflicts between all modes of transportation. Multi-modal intersections focus on intersections where numerous modes of travel come together and the coordination is required for the safety of all users. Utilizing different design features such as corner refuge islands, forward stop bars, and dedicated bike lanes, as used on Manchester Street in Concord, all intersection users can travel simultaneously, safely.

With many communities implementing these design features into roadway geometry, walking to work can be as simple as strapping on your shoes and heading out the door. By walking to work for this nationally recognized day, you will help reduce carbon emissions, get fit, and avoid the traffic jams.